Quad at Stanford University
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I am a student at Stanford University in California majoring in International Relations and minoring in Environmental Engineering. My academic path through Stanford has been unconventional to say the least. I started my freshman year as a Physics major in SLE (Structured Liberal Education), an intensive residential-based humanities core. I decided to switch to International Relations during my freshman year. At the end of my sophomore year, I decided to take a year off and explore Southeast Asia from Vietnam and Singapore. I returned to Stanford in Paris in the fall of 2008, and since then I have focused on environmental sciences and issues sustainability.

Before Stanford, I went to Douglas County High School in Castle Rock, Colorado. On this page, I have listed all the courses that I have taken at Stanford (place your mouse over them to see a description and if available, click to view the syllabus). I plan on graduatiing in June 2010 with a Bachelor's degree in International Relations. You can also click over to high school.

Autumn 2009:

Biology 101 Ecology The principles of ecology. Topics: interactions of organisms with their environment, dynamics of populations, species interactions, structure and dynamics of ecological communities, biodiversity. Prerequisite: 43, or consent of instructor. Recommended: statistics. Dirzo, Vitousek 3.00
Civil and Environmental Engineering 226 Lifecycle Assessment for Complex Systems Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry. Lepech 3.00
Chinese Language 6 Beginning Conversational Chinese, First Quarter Three quarter sequence. Basic language skills in Mandarin to function abroad. Rozelle (Liao Yu-Hwa) 2.00
Earth Systems 148
Copenhagen Climate Protocol: Interpreting the Chaos Topics include the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process from 1992 Rio meeting, Article 2 of the UNFCCC to avoid "dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system", the Conference of the Parties (COP) system, the history of earlier COPs including the Kyoto Protocol, the non-governmental organizations side events at each COP, the massive media presence, and the mainstream players and their likely positions. Class will be organized into small groups to represent the main players and debate the Copenhagen Protocol from the point of view of those groups. Lectures on the legal, historic, political, and media aspects of COPs.
2.00
Economics 51
Economic Analysis II Neoclassical analysis of general equilibrium, welfare economics, imperfect competition, externalities and public goods, intertemporal choice and asset markets, risk and uncertainty, game theory, adverse selection, and moral hazard. Multivariable calculus is used. Prerequisite: 50.
5.00
Overseas Studies Programs General 42
How to Build a Habitable Planet: An Example from the European Alps Feedback and links between global climate, mountain building, and biological evolution and landscape development of the European Alps. Long and short-term carbon cycle and the role of human perturbation; climate of Europe and influence of global connections on climate change; origin of the glaciers, global cooling and the migration of humans into Europe; policies and strategies employed by EU to mitigate effects of global warming. Students and faculty camp in three different locations. Location: Alps in Switzerland, northern Italy and France.
2.00
Political Science 118P
U.S. Relations in Iran The evolution of relations between the U.S. and Iran. The years after WW II when the U.S. became more involved in Iran. Relations after the victory of the Islamic republic. The current state of affairs and the prospects for the future. Emphasis is on original documents of U.S. diplomacy (White House, State Department, and the U.S. Embassy in Iran). Research paper.
5.00

Spring 2009:

Civil and Environmental Engineering 176B Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency Renewable and efficient electric power systems emphasizing analysis and sizing of photovoltaic arrays and wind turbines. Basic electric power generation, transmission and distribution, distributed generation, combined heat and power, fuel cells. End use demand, including lighting and motors. Masters 4.00
Earth Systems 102 Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes The energy sources that power society are rooted in fossil energy although energy from the core of the Earth and the sun is almost inexhaustible; but the rate at which energy can be drawn from them with today's technology is limited. The renewable energy resource base, its conversion to useful forms, and practical methods of energy storage. Geothermal, wind, solar, biomass, and tidal energies; resource extraction and its consequences Gerritsen, Kovscek 3.00
Economics 50 Economic Analysis I Individual consumer and firm behavior under perfect competition. The role of markets and prices in a decentralized economy. Monopoly in partial equilibrium. Economic tools developed from multivariable calculus using partial differentiation and techniques for constrained and unconstrained optimization. Tendall 5.00
Environmental Earth System Science 155
Science of Soils Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate.
4.00
Environmental Earth System Science 234
Stable Isotopes in Biogeochemistry Light stable isotopes and their application to geological, ecological, and environmental problems. Isotopic systematics of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur; chemical and biogenic fractionation of light isotopes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and rocks and minerals.
3.00
International Relations 54SI
The Taste of Thailand: Introduction to Thai Culture and History Presentations, discussions, and hands-on activities. Course is integrated with Stanford-Thai Exchange Program through which several Thai college students come to work on projects at Stanford. Cultural immersion, Thai culinary arts, and discussions with Thai exchange students.
1.00

Winter 2009:

East Asian Studies 185C Economic Development of Greater China: Past, Present, and Future Historical stages, economic and political rationales, and effectiveness of the policies and institutional changes that have shaped China's economic emergence. China's economic reform and transition during the past 20 years. Application of economic theories of incentives, institutions, markets, and economic development. Rozelle 5.00
East Asian Studies 191
Stanford Journal of East Asian Affairs
1.00
Econ 102A
5.00
Environmental Earth System Science 2 Earth System History The evolution of Earth's systems from formation to the present. Couplings and relationships among biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. Topics include the evolution of life, origin of the oceans, atmosphere and continents, and changes in climate. Modern climate change and anthropogenic effects. Chamberlain 3.00
Environmental Earth System Science 161 Statistical Methods for the Earth and Environmental Sciences: Geostatistics Statistical analysis and graphical display of data, common distribution models, sampling, and regression. The variogram as a tool for modeling spatial correlation; variogram estimation and modeling; introduction to spatial mapping and prediction with kriging; integration of remote sensing and other ancillary information using co-kriging models; spatial uncertainty; introduction to geostatistical software applied to large environmental, climatological, and reservoir engineering databases; emphasis is on practical use of geostatistical tools. Boucher 4.00

Autumn 2008:

OSP Paris 23P Intermediate French II This course continues to prepare students for advanced level French instruction with an emphasis on developing highly accurate speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students examine complex topics, using the French language in diverse contexts, reading and actively discussing a wide variety of texts relevant to French society and culture. Mercier 4.00
OSP Paris 24 Introduction to French Society This required course is intended to expose all students in the Paris program to meaningful aspects of French society, through language immersion, a series of visits and encounters with prominent figures, venues and works of art and French heritage. Within the context of this course, students will also be able to engage in volunteer work and participate in cultural and social projects of mutual interest with French students and French Stanford alumni. From a series of approximately eight events or activities, students will be asked to engage in at least four. A short resumé, explaining what students learned from their experiences, will be due at the end of the quarter. In addition students will be required to respect the program language oath of speaking French in all venues of the program throughout the quarter. Halévi, Molkou 1.00
OSP Paris 103A French Lecture Series 1 Independent attendance of lectures and discussions in Paris. All events must be in French and a short essay must be composed at the end of the quarter Halévi 1.00
OSP Paris 124X
5.00
OSP Paris 211X
Political Attitudes and Beahvior in Contemporary France This seminar will focus on three aspects of French political life. First, it will present the specificity of the Fifth Republic institutions and the evolution of the party system, challenged by the development of a strong extreme right. Secondly, it will study political behavior in France, which would cover not only voter turn-out and party choice but also non-conventional means of political action, such as demonstrations, strikes and the factors that explain it (social class, religion, gender, education, age, etc.). Thirdly, it will link political behavior with value changes (to what extent is there a weakening of the left-right cleavage, a decline of the permissive values of the sixties, a rise of religious fundamentalism, a surge of racism and anti-semitism, etc.). The seminar will be comparative in scope, outlining the similarities and differences between French and American political culture.
5.00

 

Spring 2007:

East Asian Studies 191 Stanford Journal of East Asian Affairs   1.00
French Language 22 Second Year French, Part A Proficiency-based. Advanced-level skills including past, present, and future narration, description, and defending points of view on social and cultural issues. Topics from cultural comparisons with French and Francophone contexts. Dozer 4.00
History 102 History of the International System World politics and international relations from the dominance of empires and nation states at the turn of the century to the present. The influence of communism, fascism, and anti-imperialism, and the emergence of society as a factor in international relations. Questions of sovereignty versus the new world order. Sheehan 5.00
International Relations 140C
5.00

 

Winter 2007:

French Language 5B Intensive First Year French Completes first-year language sequence in two rather than three quarters. Recommended for students with previous knowledge of French who place into 5A on the placement test. 5B fulfills the University foreign language requirement. Howard 5.00
History 158 US History Since 1945 Focus is on foreign policy and politics with less attention to social and intellectual history. Topics include nuclear weapons in WW II, the Cold War, the Korean and Vietnam wars, Eisenhower revisionism, the Bay of Pigs and Cuban missile crisis, civil rights and the black freedom struggle, the women's movement, the Great Society and backlash, welfare policy, conservatism and liberalism, the 60s anti-war movement, Watergate and the growth of executive power, Iran-Contra and Reagan revisionism, Silicon Valley, the Gulf War, the Clinton impeachment controversy, 2004 election, and 9/11 and Iraq war. Bernstein 5.00
History 197 Southeast Asia: From Antiquity to the Modern Era The history of SE Asia, comprising Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Burma, Cambodia, and Laos, from antiquity to the present. The spread of Indian cultural influences, the rise of indigenous states, and the emergence of globally linked trade networks. European colonization, economic transformation, the rise of nationalism, the development of the modern state, and the impact of globalization. Lewis 5.00
Science, Technology, and Society 110
5.00

 

Autumn 2006:

Computer Science 106A Programming Methodology Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required. Young 5.00
French Language 5A Intensive First Year French Completes first-year language sequence in two rather than three quarters. Recommended for students with previous knowledge of French who place into 5A on the placement test. 5B fulfills the University foreign language requirement. Howard 5.00
Management Science and Engineering 193 Technology and National Security The interaction of technology and national security policy from the perspective of history to implications for the new security imperative, homeland defense. Key technologies in nuclear and biological weapons, military platforms, and intelligence gathering. Policy issues from the point of view of U.S. and other nations. The impact of terrorist threat. Guest lecturers include key participants in the development of technology and/or policy. Perry, Hecker 3.00
Political Science 1
5.00

 

Spring 2006:

Economics 1 Elementary Economics The economic way of thinking and the functioning of a modern market economy. The behavior of consumers and firms. Markets for goods and inputs. Analysis of macroeconomic variables: output, employment, inflation, interest rate. Determination of long-run growth and short-term fluctuations. The role of government: regulation, monetary, and fiscal policy. Stimel 5.00
Political Science 111D British Politics Over the last two decades, Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair have provoked major changes in policies, politics, and the institution of government. The impact of these changes on the world’s oldest democracy. Dorfman 5.00
Structured Liberal Education 93 Structured Liberal Education SLE demands approximately 60 percent of the average academic workload during freshman year. Autumn Quarter focus is on the mythological and cultural foundations of ancient Greece and Israel. Greenberg 10.00

 

Winter 2006:

Math 52 Multivariable Integral Calculus Iterated integrals, line and surface integrals, vector analysis with applications to vector potentials and conservative vector fields, physical interpretations. Divergence theorem and the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Papikian 5.00
Physics 63 Electricity, Magnetism, and Waves For students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background contemplating a major in Physics or interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. The fundamental structure of classical physics including Newtonian mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, thermodynamics. Foundations of modern physics including special relativity, atomic structure, quantization of light, matter waves and the Schrödinger equation. Allen 5.00
Physics 64 Advanced Electromagnetism Laboratory Experimental work in mechanics, electricity and magnetism. Romine 5.00
Structured Liberal Education 92 Structured Liberal Education SLE demands approximately 60 percent of the average academic workload during freshman year. Winter Quarter focus is on the religious, ideological, and aesthetic transformations that occurred in Europe, Asia, and the New World as a result of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment. Clayton 9.00

 

Autumn 2005:

Math 51 Linear Algebra and Multivariable Calculus Geometry and algebra of vectors, systems of linear equations, matrices, vector valued functions and functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule in several variables, vector fields, optimization. Brubaker 5.00
Physics 59 Current Research Topics Recommended for prospective Physics majors. Presentations of current research topics by faculty with research interests related to physics, often including tours of experimental laboratories where the research is conducted. Tucker 1.00
Physics 61 Mechanics and Special Relativity For students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background contemplating a major in Physics or interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. The fundamental structure of classical physics including Newtonian mechanics, electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, thermodynamics. Foundations of modern physics including special relativity, atomic structure, quantization of light, matter waves and the Schrödinger equation. Susskind 4.00
Structured Liberal Education 91 Structured Liberal Education SLE demands approximately 60 percent of the average academic workload during freshman year. Spring Quarter focus is on the social, political, and artistic forces that shape the modern world. Schwarzburg 9.00



   
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